4 new speed zone cameras now active in Dougherty Co. school zones

New cameras in warning period for citations
Video from WALB
Published: Aug. 15, 2022 at 7:12 PM EDT
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ALBANY, Ga. (WALB) - Dougherty County schools are back in session, which also means the RedSpeed cameras are active once again.

This year, four new cameras have been added.

Those cameras are near Monroe High School, Morningside Elementary, Dougherty County High School and Northside Elementary.

The cameras in the new locations are active, but drivers do have a 30-day warning period. After those 30 days, they will start issuing citations in mid-September.

Many people WALB News 10 spoke with said the cameras are a nuisance, but they believe the overall goal of the cameras — which is to slow down drivers — has worked.

Carlton Arnold is the CEO of Pop’s Detail Shop in Albany.
Carlton Arnold is the CEO of Pop’s Detail Shop in Albany.(WALB)

Carlton Arnold is a business owner on Gillionville Road, just a few miles away from the RedSpeed cameras on Westover. In his 24 years at that location, he said he’s seen crashes almost every week.

“Traffic here is wild. They be speeding all the time,” said Arnold.

The cameras have been active for one year now.

“Yes, they’re working. You’re either going to slow down or you’re gonna get a ticket one of the two. A lot of people are slowing down. I know it slows me down,” said Arnold.

Video from WALB

Statistics from the past year show that citations in Albany peaked in November 2021. By March 2022 citations were reduced by 50%.

In the past year, nearly 50,000 citations were given and only 2% of those were contested. That ends up being around 100 citations a month, which is causing another issue for the court system.

Chad Warbington said it takes 3-4 months for people to dispute citations.
Chad Warbington said it takes 3-4 months for people to dispute citations.(WALB)

City Commissioner Chad Warbington said the city is discussing having court five days a week instead of three and is considering adding another judge to help alleviate some of the stress.

“As a citizen, part of the due process is to be heard, and you want to be heard quickly. Right now, we’re at about a three month, four month backlog. We want it to be shorter than that,” said Warbington

With five cameras active over the last year, the city has made nearly $1.6 million. That money will be used for public safety initiatives.

Although the Dougherty County School System is not responsible for the cameras, Superintendent...
Although the Dougherty County School System is not responsible for the cameras, Superintendent Kenneth Dyer said they appreciate the initiative and are supportive of the four new locations.(WALB)

Although the Dougherty County School System is not responsible for the cameras, Superintendent Kenneth Dyer said they appreciate the initiative and are supportive of the four new locations.

“I don’t think there’s a parent in Dougherty County or anywhere that would want to compromise their child’s safety, and I think the cameras are just part of the overall safety plan to keep our students safe,” said Dyer.

Dyer said several years ago, a student was hit and that the cameras give a little extra push for drivers to slow down.

“That’s something you never want to happen. I think people are going a little slower in school zones because of that awareness of the cameras,” said Dyer.

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