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Truckers react to Kemp’s executive order to address supply chain issues

In this Feb. 11, 2014, file photo, truck drivers stop at a gas station in Emerson, Ga., north...
In this Feb. 11, 2014, file photo, truck drivers stop at a gas station in Emerson, Ga., north of metro Atlanta, to fill up their tractor trailer rigs. The Biden administration is proposing stronger pollution regulations for new tractor-trailer rigs that would clean up smoky diesel engines and encourage new technologies during the next two decades. The proposal released Monday by the Environmental Protection Agency would require the industry to cut smog-and-soot-forming nitrogen oxide emissions by up to 90% per truck over current standards by 2031.(AP Photo/David Tulis, File)
Published: Apr. 15, 2022 at 6:26 PM EDT
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AUGUSTA, Ga. (WRDW/WAGT) - Governor Brian Kemp declared a state of emergency over Georgia’s supply chain issues.

In the executive order, Kemp temporarily suspended federal regulations on the number of hours truck drivers can drive. The order also says sick or tired drivers should get at least 10 hours off as soon as they stop.

Here’s what some truckers have to say about this new approach to the supply chain issue.

The last few months have impacted them in different ways. Some say they’ve had to take on heavier loads to accommodate the needs. Others say their hours have been cut to use less gas.

How this order will impact them depends on the company, but it could have a trickle-down effect on you.

“It all depends on where you’re going and how you’re going,” said Mr. Blake, truck driver.

Food is high, gas is high, all because it’s harder to get.

Kemp’s executive order will cut how long commercial drivers can be on the road. It also prohibits price gouging, especially at the pump. The order goes into place on April 16 and will last 30 days. Kemp hopes it will limit disruptions in the supply chain.

One driver told us the cost to fill up his tank has reached $1000. This is a $500 jump from average.

“It doesn’t really bother me because I’m a company driver. I let them handle that. That’s corporate,” he said.

Some drivers say they’ve already been picking up heavier loads, which is easier under the order to meet needs.

Like needs in the grocery store.

Lacy Enevoldsen, Good Earth, manager said: “It’s definitely been a little bit of a challenge, and you have to get a little creative with how you’re going to find things.”

Good Earth says many of their smaller vendors are struggling to find supplies like jars.

“We have had to make some price adjustments, but we are also striving to keep a wide range of prices so that nobody feels the hurt too much,” she said.

Challenges from the road to the shelf, but some might be out before it’s all over.

Mr. Blake said: “I’m about to retire.”

We asked him if he would miss it after 30 years.

“No,” he said while laughing.

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