2020: A year in review of WALB’s biggest stories

Updated: Dec. 29, 2020 at 6:49 PM EST
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ALBANY, Ga. (WALB) - As 2020 is drawing to a close, WALB is taking a look back at this year’s biggest stories.

If you would have asked anyone in January 2020, toilet paper supply concerns probably would not have been on their radars.

But by April, panic buying of bathroom tissue left workers at Procter and Gamble in Albany ramping up production- all to get paper products to people.

“We are working very diligently every day to make sure we can meet the needs of our customers and our consumers to get that needed product out on the shelves. Best thing we can tell you is that Charmin is on the way to you,” said John Patteson, papermaking department leader.

Panic buying of bathroom tissue left workers at Procter and Gamble in Albany ramping up...
Panic buying of bathroom tissue left workers at Procter and Gamble in Albany ramping up production.(WALB)

The coronavirus also popularized one activity in our area: bike riding.

Since Georgia and Dougherty County residents were ordered to shelter-in-place by state and local leaders, many were left looking for something to do.

“We will take the next steps to require all citizens of Albany and Dougherty County to shelter in place. This means, residents must remain in their homes, except from traveling to and work, purchasing food and attending medical appointments or seeking medical treatment,” Albany Mayor Bo Dorough said previously.

Out of this order though, came a positive business boom for one Albany small business owner.

“I spend a lot of my day telling people no, like no we don’t have any bikes. No, there is not any bikes and no, I don’t know when there is going to be any bikes,” said Gene Kirk, owner of “Breakaway Cycles.”

Since Georgia and Dougherty county residents were ordered to shelter in-place by state and...
Since Georgia and Dougherty county residents were ordered to shelter in-place by state and local leaders, many were left looking for something to do.(WALB)

Schools were also impacted by the virus, closing for weeks, and even months at a time.

Parents were promoted to home-school teachers.

And despite the move to virtual learning, schools and organizations still did what they could to keep their kids from going hungry at home.

“When parents had to feed their children for several months now, it creates some hardships. And so, we felt necessary that we help our parents to provide the necessary resources, the necessary nourishment for our children during this extended closure,” said Dr. William Todd Cason, superintendent for Valdosta City Schools.

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