Wildlife officials warn of invasive lizard

United State Geological Survey (USGS) student contractor Danny Haro from Georgia Southern...
United State Geological Survey (USGS) student contractor Danny Haro from Georgia Southern University with a tegu caught in a trap in western Tattnall County.(G.O.N.)
Published: Sep. 29, 2020 at 1:39 PM EDT
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ALBANY, Ga. (WALB) - The disruption of the ecosystem and the devastation caused by the Burmese Python in the Florida Everglades is widely known and well-documented.

Georgia wildlife advocates are hopeful that Georgia won’t endure its own version of a catastrophic invasion by the Argentine tegu, which has been found in Toombs and Tatnall Counties.

No one is sure how the non-native tegus got loose in Georgia, but they will eat most anything, including the eggs of other species. Females can lay 35 eggs a year.

Adults captured in Georgia have been three feet or longer. In comparison, none of Georgia’s native lizards are less than a foot long. Six tegus have been collected in Tattnall and Toombs counties this year.

Get the full story here from Georgia Outdoor News.

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