Albany small business owner warns of fake bills

Albany small business owner warns of fake bills

ALBANY, Ga. (WALB) - For employees at Albany’s Smallcakes, taking payments and filling cupcake orders is what they do all day long.

“A customer came in and ordered cupcakes, and he paid with $100 bill. Our cashier, she checked it with the marker, and it changed colors, so she accepted it and didn’t think anything else about it," Lyndsey Hall Bridges, SmallCakes owner, said.

But there was something different about the $100 bill.

After the employee finished out her shift and put the money in the safe, Bridges started to doubt that the bill was authentic.

“I started rubbing it to see if it would separate, and the texture was a little different, but not overly different. It was one of the old-style hundred dollar bills that they had copied, not one of the new ones. But it just, it just was off you could kind of tell something wasn’t quite right about it,” said Bridges.

She walked right across the street to Regions Bank, and they confirmed that it was counterfeit.

The bank reported the incident to the Secret Service.

Bridges said the $100 bill was printed over a $10 bill, so the magnetic line was still visible.

Albany Police Department Lt. John Segroves said it can be difficult to spot fake money unless you know what to look for.

Lindsay Bridges wanted other small businesses to be aware of the fake money that could be circulating through the community.
Lindsay Bridges wanted other small businesses to be aware of the fake money that could be circulating through the community. (Source: WALB)

“On these $100 bills, you’ll see they have some pinkish-red writing on the front and the back. This is not where somebody has been drawing on. None of your American money will have foreign symbols on it. So, that’s one clue right there. If you hold the bills up to the light, you won’t be able to see the magnetic strip that’s supposed to be there. That type of thing. So those are just a couple of things you need to look for," said Segroves.

Bridges wanted other small businesses to be aware of the fake money that could be circulating through the community and took to Facebook.

“People were sharing, and I saw a lot of people tagging other businesses. And so that was my main reason for doing it — just to let people know they’re circulating. You know, you let your guard down sometimes, and so it was kind of like ‘hey, pick that guard back up," said Bridges.

And although she knows what to look for now, Bridges said her business won’t be taking any more $100 bills any time soon.

“We are sticking to nothing larger than a $20 bill. And we take cash app, Venmo, credit cards, so there are so many other payment options to try to keep ourselves safe from losing that money," said Bridges.

Segroves said that it is a felony offense to possess and distribute fake money.

Copyright 2020 WALB. All rights reserved.