Grandmother and educator believes virtual learning will help teach students about responsibilities

Grandmother and educator believes virtual learning will help teach students about responsibilities

AMERICUS, Ga. (WALB) - A former educator said she’s prepared to help navigate her three grandchildren through the virtual classroom.

COVID-19 created a strange world for us all, especially for those in education.

“No, I haven’t had to deal with anything like this,” said Dr. Oneida Wade Ingram.

Ingram spent around 30 years of her life as an educator in Dooley County. She has many other titles under her belt which includes being listed as a substitute teacher now in Sumter County.

Virtual learning in Sumter County begins Monday for the first nine weeks of the school year.

Ingram said she’s thankful school this year is kicking off online and said “all I could say was, thank you, Jesus.” She said she is very appreciative of school leadership for making that decision.

Ingram will be helping her three grandchildren with virtual learning, one of which she has full guardianship over.

Two of the three grandchildren Ingram will help during virtual learning.
Two of the three grandchildren Ingram will help during virtual learning. (Source: Dr. Oneida Wade Ingram)

“They will be coming to me every day,” Ingram told WALB News 10.

Although the classroom may be virtual, the routines are not.

“I want to get them back into the frame, the mindset of getting up, getting dressed, eating breakfast and then logging on,” explained Ingram.

She said she believes she’s prepared to tackle virtual learning and believes it will bring more than just knowledge to Sumter County students.

“I do believe that this virtual learning will draw parents closer and it will motivate them more to be an active part in their children’s education and will teach children responsibilities,” Ingram said.

All Sumter County students were given the opportunity to get Chromebooks for the start of virtual learning.

Ingram said her three students “need to take care of them the same way they take care of their cell phones.”

She said she doesn’t foresee any problems with virtual learning with her three grandkids but has concerns for others.

“What are the teachers who are teaching and have children, what are they gonna do with their children?” Ingram wondered.

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