Lawmakers consider possible changes to Georgia’s seat belt law

Lawmakers consider possible changes to Georgia’s seat belt law
Under the current law, everyone sitting in the front seat of a vehicle must buckle up. But in the back seat, only passengers who are 17 and under have to buckle up. (Source: WTOC)

ATLANTA, Ga. (WTOC) - Georgia’s legislative session is well underway.

As lawmakers begin to introduce new bills, there are talks that some legislators are calling for stricter seat belt laws.

Under the current law, everyone sitting in the front seat of a vehicle must buckle up. But in the back seat, only passengers who are 17 and under have to buckle up.

Chatter is going around Atlanta of a possible bill that would require all occupants, regardless of age, to wear a seat belt in both the front and back seats.

Georgia State Patrol encourages everyone to buckle up, regardless of where they are sitting in a vehicle. Troopers say they are for this change to Georgia’s seat belt law.

WTOC spoke with the post commander of GSP Post 42, which covers several surrounding counties. He says seat belts save lives and a change in this law would help reinforce that message.

“It seems a little ridiculous at times because it feels like you’re sending a message that you have to be restrained in the front to keep you safe, but you’ll be fine in the back seat,” said SFC Christopher Nease, Georgia State Patrol.

The last time Georgia’s seat belt law was altered was back in 2010 when drivers and passengers in pickup trucks were made to wear seat belts.

WTOC will continue to follow the General Assembly closely and report on any new developments.

You can also follow the progress of bills during the legislative session by clicking here.

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