School heat safety; protecting your kids from dangerous heat wave

School heat safety; protecting your kids from dangerous heat wave

ALBANY, Ga. (WALB) - Officials have received six heat-related calls in just two days and the Director of Dougherty County Emergency Management Services said it can happen to anyone, including your kids.

EMS said just by starting the car and letting it cool off before entering, or even feeling the heat off the metal belt before touching it, you’re taking steps to keep you and your children safe from the heat.

The Dougherty County School System is also looking at ways to help your kids in these hot temperatures.

Summer heat doesn't leave when the bell rings.

“It’s extremely hot,” said Dougherty County EMS Director Sam Allen.

Sam Allen is the Dougherty County EMS director.
Sam Allen is the Dougherty County EMS director. (Source: WALB)

Also hot are things your children come into contact with every day.

Allen said it can event put them in the hospital.

“Slides are notoriously dangerous. When kids get on that, they think it’s going to be a fun ride and it burns them all the way down,” explained Allen.

Allen said playground equipment can reach more than 200 degrees, causing second degree burns.

It’s what Dougherty County School System leaders said they want to avoid.

“Instead of going outside for physical fitness, they may remain inside in the gymnasiums and do something internally there,” said LaKisha Bryant Bruce, the director of community relations for Dougherty County Schools.

Dougherty County Schools Director of Community Relations LaKisha Bryant Bruce
Dougherty County Schools Director of Community Relations LaKisha Bryant Bruce (Source: WALB)

Bruce said all schools take precautions regarding extreme heat, but wants the parents’ help when it comes to dressing children appropriately.

“There tends to be this trend for students to like to wear their hoodie and their sweaters all the time, it is too hot for that,” said Bruce.

Cool down comes for those riding the bus.

Bruce said they are still keeping an eye on it.

“If a child comes home and they tell a parent that their bus was hot, make sure you notify the principal so that’s something that we can pay attention to,” Bruce said.

For kids being picked up, Allen said it’s the parents’ job to make sure they are in safe conditions.

“As you’re going to buckle the child in, check the car seat to make sure that it’s not too overly hot,” said Allen.

Allen said a car closed up for 30 minuets or longer can raise temperatures by 60 to 70 degrees, so it’s important to allow the car to cool down first.

The athletics departments in schools are required to monitor outdoor practice conditions as well.

Copyright 2019 WALB. All rights reserved.