Valdosta spends thousands on accurate road work

Valdosta spends thousands on accurate road work
City leaders have contracted Infrastructure Management Services to use their technology for a pavement management tool.

VALDOSTA, Ga. (WALB) - The City of Valdosta is spending about $110,000 for more accurate use of taxpayers’ dollars that are spent on road work.

City leaders said that roads that have potholes get the most attention.

City leaders have contracted Infrastructure Management Services (IMS) to use their technology for a pavement management tool.

City leaders have contracted Infrastructure Management Services to use their technology for a pavement management tool.
City leaders have contracted Infrastructure Management Services to use their technology for a pavement management tool.

They said the goal of this new company is to check for infrastructure issues below the surface to ensure that those roads get the attention that they need.

“In the past, we’ve basically gone out and done visual inspections," said Valdosta Traffic Manager, Larry Ogden.

That will be no more thanks to new technology.

“And that will give us a better interpretation of how we allocate funds to the resurfacing project," said Ogden.

The tool is going to be used to survey 288 miles of road throughout the City of Valdosta, over the next 3 weeks.

“Here we’re not guessing the conditions of the road. We have facts. We have scientific information and data that shows this road needs to be resurfaced before this road," said Ogden.

This will help the city to prioritize the taxpayers’ dollars used for street maintenance.

“Creating these reports, you’ll see that there’s actually a tremendous amount of damage beneath the road in the subsurface," said Henry Willis, IMS Road Surface Technician.

They hope to use the funds to maintain the roads in need, as opposed to waiting for noticeable issues to appear, with the help of some pretty advanced technology connected to their van.

“Which has two big laser pods on the rear, those laser pods basically scan the road and create what’s called a pavement condition index," said Willis.

Officials ask that if you see the IMS trucks on the road or happen to get stuck behind one, that you do your best to be patient.

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