Farmer uses tractor, massive signs to send message to city leaders

Albany Farmer Complaints

ALBANY, GA (WALB) - A tractor driving down the streets of Albany, pulling a 10-foot tall sign behind it may have caught your attention recently in Albany.

It’s a protest sign with a character, representing the city, blowing it’s nose into a tissue with the words “14th Amendment” written on it.

An Albany farmer has been driving this 10' x 10' poster on the back of a tractor all over the city. He says he hopes it inspires people to become aware, unify and then take action. Catch the full story on the unusual protest at 6 on WALB News 10.

An Albany farmer has been driving this 10' x 10' poster on the back of a tractor all over the city. He says he hopes it inspires people to become aware, unify and then take action. Catch the full story on the unusual protest at 6 on WALB News 10.

Posted by Grason Passmore WALB on Thursday, April 25, 2019

One Albany farmer said he thinks it may be too late to save his land, but in a message traveling around the city, he said he wants to tell people it’s not too late to save Albany.

“For the first time in my life, I felt powerless, absolutely powerless,” said Bill Moore.

Moore farms hay on land he said may now be damaged beyond repair.

“I said, ‘Please, you can’t do this, this is my livelihood. Our hopes and dreams are right here on this small piece of land,’” said Moore.

In what many may call an unconventional method, Moore taking to his tractor to voice his concern.

“On the streets talking to people, I want them to come to me and say, ‘What is this about?’ So I can tell them,” said Moore.

And when Moore is pulling a 10 foot by 10 foot sign behind a tractor through the city, it doesn’t take long for people to notice.

“Albany is not a bad place to live, but the consensus is, we can do a lot better,” said Moore.

Moore said he’s been left with damaged land after the Army Corps of Engineers stored storm debris on 10 percent of the land he leases from the city.

City Attorney Nathan Davis did confirm the Corps used the land for storage, but he said it was necessary because Hurricane Michael was labeled an emergency,

“It will be a considerable amount of time before a crop can actually grow here, and a lot of work,” explained Moore.

The debris is gone, but Moore said the damage remains. He said rather than whine about what he’s lost, he wants to show people in Albany it’s okay to stand up and speak out if you feel something isn’t right. Even if you’d rather take a more conventional way to do so.

“We’re all in the same boat and it’s time for all of us to row that boat toward a better Albany,” said Moore.

While Moore said it could take years to repair the damage done, he said he doesn’t want people in Albany to forget his message: awareness, unity, action.

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