Citizens concerned 3D guns could be a potential threat

Citizens concerned 3D guns could be a potential threat
Jason Sheffield, Manager of Dawson Road Pawn Shop. (Source: WALB).
Jason Sheffield, Manager of Dawson Road Pawn Shop. (Source: WALB).
In order to print 3D plastic guns, a 3D printer is involved. (Source: WALB).
In order to print 3D plastic guns, a 3D printer is involved. (Source: WALB).

ALBANY, GA (WALB) - With the proposal to allow nationwide downloads of blueprints for 3-D printed guns in the federal court system right now, some South Georgians continue contemplating the possibility.

Since 2013, one group of gun activists have been working to reach a settlement with the US government, allowing them to post 3-D printable gun plans online.

It had been approved but just before it was set to go into effect, federal courts stepped in to put a temporary ban on the release of the blueprints.

Saturday, some people in South Georgia said they believe if approved, 3-D printed guns could cause potential harm.

"As a gun activist I would say I am completely against anybody having the right to make a plastic weapon, a printable weapon," said Tom Gieryic, citizen.

Tom Gieryic has been a gun activist for most of his life. Although he's a concealed gun carrier, he said he's fearful of what a plastic 3-D printable gun can do.

"If that kind of gun is laying around which no gun ought to, but a little kid picks it up and thinks it's a toy, then you're going to have a whole other set of bad things going on with kids shooting kids unintentionally," said Gieryic.

According to CNN, gun activists have tried to reached a settlement with the government to allow them to post 3D printable gun blueprints online, for download.

"You plug in the blueprints, you put in the parameters of whatever the size and the dimensions of this gun are, you plug that in and mash a print button then it prints out a rendered plastic version of that weapon," said Jason Sheffield, Manager of Dawson Road Pawn Shop.

This kind of weapon has some gun dealers, like Jason Sheffield, who has managed Dawson Road Pawn Shop for 20 years, highly concerned.

"It's illegal to make a weapon without the proper license. So for them to release these kinds of blueprints online and make it available for anybody to print this, that could be somebody that has a wrap sheet a mile long," said Sheffield.

With Southwest Georgia seeing crime scenes this year that started with guns and ended with deaths, the possibility of creating a plastic gun with one click of a button, leaves many alarmed.

"I'm not for telling somebody they can't have a certain kind of weapon but I am against somebody trying to make a weapon, giving the ability for anybody to make a weapon no matter who you are," said Sheffield.

Over the weekend, WALB talked with three other gun shop owners who didn't want to go on camera.

They each said they believe this could cause more crime in the community.

They said if the 3-D printed guns are assessable to citizens in the near future, they will be against it.

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