Tracking technology helps kids with autism - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

Tracking technology helps kids with autism

Jordan Lyons and Keenyau Wood look at the AngelSense device that is saving lives. (Source: WALB) Jordan Lyons and Keenyau Wood look at the AngelSense device that is saving lives. (Source: WALB)
AngelSense is a tracking device to help locate individuals before they wander off. (Source: WALB) AngelSense is a tracking device to help locate individuals before they wander off. (Source: WALB)
The tracking device tells you exactly where the person is. (Source: WALB) The tracking device tells you exactly where the person is. (Source: WALB)
CAMILLA, GA (WALB) -

Sunday, a Southwest Georgia family shared their story about a device that has helped their child cope with autism.

US law now requires the Department of Justice to give $2 million in grants each year to help law enforcement and nonprofits buy tracking devices for children with autism.

"I wish for those days you know when he can come in and he can just run around, be a normal little boy. We can sit down just have a conversation," said Keenyau Wood, grandmother of Jordan Lyons. 

Wood has been the guardian of six-year-old Jordan Lyons since he was one month old.

At 18 months, doctors diagnosed him with autism.

Unlike other kids, he can't talk or be self-sufficient. 

"It's disheartening sometimes. You get sad sometimes that I can't sit down and have a normal conversation with him and talk as a grandma," said Wood.  

In 2014, she heard about a child with autism drowning in a lake after wandering off.

She said she had to do something to keep her grandson safe. 

"When we go to the beach or we're around a pool, he would automatically, didn't know how to swim, he was one or two, he would automatically just go in and walk into the water," said Wood.  

She then discovered AngelSense, a tracking device that can pinpoint a person's every move down to the second. 

"When I saw it, it was almost like a God-send at one point," said Wood.  

With new upgrades and an app, Wood can now talk to Jordan no matter where he is.

She can listen to his surroundings, and get alerts before it's too late.

Now she's happy the Kevin & Avonte's Law, became law in the U.S. this year, to help other families like her get assistance with buying devices that could keep loved ones alive.

"For the law to be passed to help low-income families, I am very grateful," said Wood. 

President Trump signed the law in March.

Jordan's family said he's doing well thanks to the device.

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