Albany-Dougherty County crews staying ahead of mosquito problems

Albany-Dougherty County crews staying ahead of mosquito problems
Officials were out pre-treating areas where mosquito lava sits this week. (Source: WALB)
Donelle Mathis is the Environmental Control Manager. (Source: WALB)
Donelle Mathis is the Environmental Control Manager. (Source: WALB)
The mosquito lava sits in still water. (Source: WALB)
The mosquito lava sits in still water. (Source: WALB)

ALBANY, GA (WALB) - Albany and Dougherty environmental control experts are working to stay ahead of the bugs that will begin to come out as the temperatures increase.

"We are going to go in here and check the catch basin for mosquito lava," said an environmental employee as he dipped a bucked into a neighborhood catch basin.

One at a time environmental control officials check for mosquito lava.

Inside the catch basins officials said there are sometimes hundreds of mosquitoes.

"Catch basins were built years ago and had what we call traps," explained Environmental Control Manager, Donelle Mathis. "Four to six-inch traps in the catch basin which held sand and leaves from clogging up the drain, but at the same time hold water."

Once the water sits there for more than 10 days, Mathis said the mosquitoes will begin to hatch.

"That can be a potential problem right at someone's front door," said Mathis.

So for the past several days, officials have been treating the basins using briquets.

"It's what you call a slow release," explained Mathis. "He will release the methoprene that will kill the mosquitoes or cause them to have one wing, one eye or one leg where they won't live long."

The hope is that they'll be able to kill off thousands of mosquitoes before they start hanging out in your yard.

"I hope this will be a great year for us. We will continue to do what we do, continue to do our spraying before the complaints come in and I think we will be fine, I really think we'll be fine," said Mathis.

Last year, you may have seen more mosquitoes than usual because of the standing water and downed trees the January storms left behind.

Crews began spraying with the trucks in January. This year they plan to start that spraying in a few weeks depending on the amount of rain we get.

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