Historic Thomasville architecture unveiled

Historic Thomasville architecture unveiled
Thomasville has a rich architectural legacy. (Source: WALB)
Back in the 1800s architects focused on two distinct styles. (Source: WALB)
Back in the 1800s architects focused on two distinct styles. (Source: WALB)
Folks in Thomasville plan to keep the architectural history alive. (Source: WALB)
Folks in Thomasville plan to keep the architectural history alive. (Source: WALB)
Pioneers who saw the potential of what Thomasville could be. (Source: WALB)
Pioneers who saw the potential of what Thomasville could be. (Source: WALB)

THOMASVILLE, GA (WALB) - "Preservation is about telling and keeping these structures around so that you can tell that story," said Preservation Manager Sophia Latz.

WALB got a chance to get a firsthand look at some of the historical wonders that tell stories of past times that today's generation can not.

Standing tall and strong through wars, depressions and segregation, Landmark Preserve guided us through Thomasville's rich architectural legacy.

"The buildings in Thomasville and really any historic building, they were meant to be used year after year, generation after generation, whether it's a commercial property or a residential property," explained Latz.

Named after Jett Thomas, a war general, Thomasville was founded in 1825 and officially became a  town in 1831.

Fast-forward to today and you can see gems left by the pioneers who saw the potential of what Thomasville could be.

"My favorite house is the Hardaway House on Dawson Street circa 1856. It's a Greek revival italianated structure with really large overhanging edges and it has this beautiful door surround to it, which are the paneling around the side lights and the transom around the door," described Latz.

The beautiful home housed several of Thomasville's leaders for over a century, such as the city's first mayor.

"It was really instrumental to a really influential person in Thomasville's history and the legacy of stewardship with that house is something commendable," said Latz.

Back in the 1800s architects focused on two distinct styles when constructing commercial and residential buildings - Greek revival and Queen Ann-Folk Victorian homes.

Both were built with the future in mind.

"Particularly with residential properties, they were built to have multiple generations residing in them, maybe at one time, maybe year after year, you passed your home down like you would a broach or your favorite book, property or baseball cap from your grandfather," explained Latz.

Preservation Manager Sophia Latz says community and preservation are bonded together.

To keep the history of Thomasville alive, everyone must lend a hand.

"As of next year, 50 percent of our housing stock is historic, meaning that it is 50 years of age or older. That means that we have so much to preserve in each of these histories and each of these communities," concluded Latz.

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