Will Dougherty County's opioid reenactment save student's lives? - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

Will Dougherty County's opioid reenactment save student's lives?

Dougherty County first responders and school officials said they were pleased with the Opioid Awareness reenactment they hosted Tuesday. (Source: WALB) Dougherty County first responders and school officials said they were pleased with the Opioid Awareness reenactment they hosted Tuesday. (Source: WALB)
The reenactment was supposed to look real and hopefully, a little shocking. (Source: WALB) The reenactment was supposed to look real and hopefully, a little shocking. (Source: WALB)
DOUGHERTY CO., GA (WALB) -

Dougherty County first responders and school officials said they were pleased with the Opioid Awareness reenactment they hosted Tuesday at the Albany Civic Center.  

But now the question is, will it be effective and save lives?

The reenactment was supposed to look real and hopefully, a little shocking.

"Y'all used real police, it was like a real scene. Got real people, the real coroner and everything. It really touched me. And I think it got to them," said Dougherty High School senior Ja'Quavius McClendon.

The first responders wanted it to look real because they have been seeing too many overdoses recently.

The scene was a graduation party that turned deadly.  

Officials know those parties will be starting soon, and they want to send a message.

"It's senior year and people want to party because we are about to graduate. The drugs is the new thing. People popping pills. So I feel like everybody can relate and see what's going to happen if they do drugs," said Westover senior Ayani Simpson.

Paramedics said they are having to administer an increasing amount of Narcan, a medicine to block the opioid effects. 

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"I think in this day and time, drugs is taking over our generation," said McClendon. "Weed and all that."

School officials and first responders were happy with the program, but did the students take the message to heart?

"That can't happen to me. I mean I'm invincible," said Simpson.  

Simpson was asked if she thinks the program will help, she said, "I think it will."

"I think it was very effective for the kids in all the high schools, " said McClendon.

Now the question is, will the program save lives? Only time will tell.

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