Valdosta Water Department corrects drinking water violation

Valdosta Water Department corrects drinking water violation
In Valdosta, the city's water department has corrected and is still monitoring the drinking water after being in violation of two drinking water standards. (Source: WALB)
The city's water was measured to have one, one-hundredth of a milligram per liter too high of haloacetic acid. (Source: WALB)
The city's water was measured to have one, one-hundredth of a milligram per liter too high of haloacetic acid. (Source: WALB)
It's called HAA5, a disinfection byproduct. (Source: WALB)
It's called HAA5, a disinfection byproduct. (Source: WALB)
Valdosta Water Department Superintendent Jason Barnes (Source: WALB)
Valdosta Water Department Superintendent Jason Barnes (Source: WALB)

VALDOSTA, GA (WALB) - In Valdosta, the city's water department has corrected and is still monitoring the drinking water after being in violation of two drinking water standards.

The city's water was measured to have one, one-hundredth of a milligram per liter too high of haloacetic acid. It's called HAA5, a disinfection byproduct.

High overages of HAA5 can cause people, after many years, to experience problems with their liver, kidneys or central nervous system and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

However, Valdosta water officials said that is not the case in their city. They said the violation does not pose a threat to the quality of the water supply.

"Rules are rules set by the EPD, and me as a superintendent of the water plant and my guys that are here, we take pride in what we do each and every day. The public needs to know, even though it's a little bit over and it's not going to hurt anything, it's not going to change the water quality, that hey, they need to know what's going on with their water," said Valdosta Water Department Superintendent Jason Barnes.

Officials said people should not be alarmed and don't need to seek alternative water supplies.

"They don't need to boil their water or anything like that like I said, it was a little bit over," explained Barnes. "Basically, this first one happened in September, so if it was that critical, EPD would have let the public know."

Barnes said the water department will do a reoccurring, scheduled flush which will help prevent water stagnation.

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