Pine pollen drops, thanks to rain

Pine pollen drops, thanks to rain
Chehaw Natural Resources Manager, Ben Kirkland, believes the spring-like warmth in February led to the early return of pine pollen. (Source: WALB)
Chehaw Natural Resources Manager, Ben Kirkland, believes the spring-like warmth in February led to the early return of pine pollen. (Source: WALB)
Tuesday's rain assisted in knocking out a good portion of the pine pollen across South Georgia. (Source: WALB)
Tuesday's rain assisted in knocking out a good portion of the pine pollen across South Georgia. (Source: WALB)
The pine cones are the "females" and are not actually producing the yellow pollen. (Source: WALB)
The pine cones are the "females" and are not actually producing the yellow pollen. (Source: WALB)

ALBANY, GA (WALB) - The worst of the pine pollen season may be behind us.

During the springtime, pine pollen is produced by small pencil-thin male pine cones

This is where the yellow pollen seen on vehicles and blowing in the wind comes from.

February's stretch of ten days of 80-degree weather kick-started pollen season earlier than normal in Southwest Georgia.

However, Tuesday's rain washed away most of the pine pollen.

"I'm driving through the park looking at the trees, and I'm just not seeing pollen on the male cones right now," said Ben Kirkland, Chehaw Natural Resources Manager. "I think they were far enough along that the rain knocked out whatever was left.".

Pollen counts for other trees and plants are still high including Alder, Juniper, and Elm.

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