Honey bees essential to everyday living

Honey bees essential to everyday living
WALB News 10's Asia Wilson got dressed in a bee suit today with the SOWEGA Beekeepers Club. (Source: WALB)
The USDA says one in three bites of food we eat is derived from plants pollinated by bees. (Source: WALB)
The USDA says one in three bites of food we eat is derived from plants pollinated by bees. (Source: WALB)
Thon Carey is the Vice President of the SOWEGA Beekeepers Club. (Source: WALB)
Thon Carey is the Vice President of the SOWEGA Beekeepers Club. (Source: WALB)
Many of the SOWEGA Beekeepers Club members do this as a hobby. (Source: WALB)
Many of the SOWEGA Beekeepers Club members do this as a hobby. (Source: WALB)
Nature needs bees, bees need nature, and we need both. (Source: WALB)
Nature needs bees, bees need nature, and we need both. (Source: WALB)

ALBANY, GA (WALB) - As spring quickly approaches, insects become much more prevalent.

That includes bees, but scientists say we need them in our environment.

The USDA says one in three bites of food we eat is derived from plants pollinated by bees.

So if we didn't have bees, we wouldn't have the healthy foods we know and love.

"Every pollinated flower produces a fruit, so if every flower gets visited by a bee, then you have more fruit," Thon Carey, vice president of SOWEGA Beekeepers Club.

Imagine life without fruits, nuts, seeds, or vegetables.

"Most your berries and your nuts need a bug to pollinate them," said Carey.

Beekeepers like Carey say when a bee lands on a plant, it pollinates a flower or a seed and causes it to grow.

That in turn, helps with our daily diets.

"The nectar is there to draw bees to the flower and that nectar is used as a carbohydrate source," said Carey.

When a bee connects with nature, they go back to their hives, bringing back the pollen to reproduce more bees and honey.

"If it's not a wind blown pollinate plant, typically bees will improve the crop if they are," said Carey.

Southwest Georgia Beekeepers Club members said they hold this message near and dear to their hearts.

"I just really enjoy bees, I mean that's the main thing to me, bee's themselves are just a whole lot of fun. They are a lot of fun to keep. They are a lot of fun to manage. I like raising bees," said Carey.

Carey said they hope the hobby will help educate the community about this small creature's role in our lives.

"The more diverse any habitat is, the better everything will do, wild life in general including the bees," said Carey.

The Southwest Georgia Beekeepers Club will hold a beekeeper class at Chehaw Park, Saturday, March 10 at 9 a.m.

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