'Never Walk again': Runner supporting Snickers Marathon racers overcame brain trauma

'Never Walk again': Runner supporting Snickers Marathon racers overcame brain trauma
Stephanie Freeman was told she would never walk again because of a brain injury, but after months of physical therapy she's not only walking but running. (Source: WALB)
Stephanie Freeman (Source: WALB)
Stephanie Freeman (Source: WALB)
But before a brain injury at age 14, Freeman was never fond of running. (Source: Stephanie Freeman)
But before a brain injury at age 14, Freeman was never fond of running. (Source: Stephanie Freeman)
After spending four months in rehab at the Phoebe North Campus, she gradually became an avid runner, participating in the Snickers Marathon for the past six years. (Source: WALB)
After spending four months in rehab at the Phoebe North Campus, she gradually became an avid runner, participating in the Snickers Marathon for the past six years. (Source: WALB)

ALBANY, GA (WALB) - Stephanie Freeman was told she would never walk again because of a brain injury, but after months of physical therapy she's not only walking but running.

This year, she'll be sitting out the Snickers Marathon race and instead, she'll be rooting for fellow runners who will need all of the encouragement to reach the finish line.

Freeman will be one of the first out on the streets with her lawn chair. She will be cheering on every single runner in Saturday's Snickers Marathon across from the very place that allowed her to walk again.

"This is the make it or break it point, right here, this is around mile 20 or 21 and they're hustling and it's hard to get through, and I try to bring some positive energy to them," said Freeman.

But before a brain injury at age 14, Freeman was never fond of running.

"I was told I would never walk again, so running these streets means a whole lot to me," explained Freeman.

After spending four months in rehab at the Phoebe North Campus, she gradually became an avid runner, participating in the Snickers Marathon for the past six years.

"I used activity to battle anything," said Freeman.

And on Saturday, she'll be passing along that same positive energy to her fellow runners, holding a banner that reads, "share your strong," the name of her non-profit.

"To encourage never giving up and that it can be done, it can be done naturally," said Freeman.

Freeman and her son will be up bright and early outside of the Phoebe North Campus with their signs around mile 20 or 21, pushing those runners on to the finish line.

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