Chehaw helps preserve red wolf populations

Chehaw helps preserve red wolf populations
Red wolves typically live longer in captivity than in the wild. (Source: WALB)
Red wolves typically live longer in captivity than in the wild. (Source: WALB)
The red wolves at Chehaw are active on chilly mornings. (Source: WALB)
The red wolves at Chehaw are active on chilly mornings. (Source: WALB)
Ben Roberts, Director of Animal Care says this is the first time a pair of red wolves have had trouble mating at Chehaw. (Source: WALB)
Ben Roberts, Director of Animal Care says this is the first time a pair of red wolves have had trouble mating at Chehaw. (Source: WALB)

ALBANY, GA (WALB/CNN) - Chehaw is sending a pair of critically endangered red wolves to a North Carolina zoo with hopes they will successfully breed.

There are only 250 red wolves in captivity and 50 in the wild

Eleven of the captive red wolves are at Chehaw.

The decision to breed two of the red wolves in North Carolina was made by Chehaw and the Species Survival Program.

All of the red wolves that are in the wild now came from the captive population, which is why breeding programs are important.

"Red wolves actually exist today because of zoos and North American zoos," said Director of Animal Care Ben Roberts.

Chehaw has had success breeding their own healthy red wolves in the past.

Two years ago Chehaw had a litter of 7 red wolf pups which was the highest litter for that year in the country.

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