Lee Co. Middle School West students learn about then experience - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

Lee Co. Middle School West students learn about then experience eclipse

Students at Lee County Middle School watched the phenomenon on Monday. (Source: WALB) Students at Lee County Middle School watched the phenomenon on Monday. (Source: WALB)
In Lee County, students saw this around 2:40 in the afternoon. (Source: WALB) In Lee County, students saw this around 2:40 in the afternoon. (Source: WALB)
Some students used both pairs of glasses to watch. (Source: WALB) Some students used both pairs of glasses to watch. (Source: WALB)
Brian Soash is a middle school math and science teacher. (Source: WALB) Brian Soash is a middle school math and science teacher. (Source: WALB)
Soash spent the day teaching students about the eclipse. (Source: WALB) Soash spent the day teaching students about the eclipse. (Source: WALB)
LEE CO., GA (WALB) -

Many people watched Monday afternoon as the moon passed over the sun, in awe at what they saw. 

Among them were hundreds of students at Lee County Middle School West. 

They spent the whole day learning about the eclipse before watching it themselves. 

This was awesome," exclaimed Jacob Lawing, a seventh-grade student. Lawing spent more than a half hour with his eyes glued to the sky, watching the eclipse. 

"It looked like a banana in the sky," said Colin Galligan. He said it looked nothing like how he anticipated it would. 

They and many other students at Lee County Middle School West were stunned by the solar phenomenon they witnessed on Monday.

"It's very bizarre in a way because it's the same timing," said Shan Khan. He said he's grateful his school allowed him to view it and provided him and his fellow students the glasses to be able to watch safely.  

Every student at the school was given glasses and had the chance to watch. 

The school day was extended in order to give students time to watch and talk about what they saw with their teachers. 

"It's one of those experiences we won't ever have again," said Christian Dozier. 

The learning started well before the eclipse.

Early Monday morning seventh-grade students began learning about the eclipse, including what people used to think it was before scientists understood it. 

"I'm super excited I get to see the eclipse with you guys," said Brian Soash to his class.

Soash teaches both science and math classes at the middle school. 

On Monday, Soash taught students about lighting, shadows and why we're able to witness what we did in the sky through a demonstration with different colored light bulbs.

"We tried to make as big of a deal as it as possible because it is a big day for the students," explained Soash. 

When students got outside, they said they had a better understanding of what was happening. 

"What we did in the STEM lab with the light bubble taught me about how the light reflects," said Megan Hendley.

Soash said he hopes the solar eclipse is something students will forever cherish.

"There's not always a lot of things in life that we see. Sometimes we are passing by and looking at our phones or playing a video game or whatever else is out there. This is something that hopefully they can see, and a memory they can cherish that's real science, hopefully, for the rest of their life," explained Soash.

Parents were also invited to the school to watch with their children. 

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