People reminisce on last total solar eclipse in Georgia - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

People reminisce on last total solar eclipse in Georgia

People are gearing up for Monday's eclipse (Source: WALB) People are gearing up for Monday's eclipse (Source: WALB)
Crowds of people showed up at Valdosta State University to watch the total solar eclipse (Source: YouTube, made available by VSU Archives) Crowds of people showed up at Valdosta State University to watch the total solar eclipse (Source: YouTube, made available by VSU Archives)
This is a clip from a national newscast on March 7, 1970 (Source: YouTube, VSU Archives) This is a clip from a national newscast on March 7, 1970 (Source: YouTube, VSU Archives)
ALBANY, GA (WALB) -

For some people in southwest Georgia, this won't be the first time they've witnessed a solar eclipse.

The last total solar eclipse to pass over the continental U.S. was in 1979, according to NASA. That was only a partial view in Georgia.

On March 7, 1970, a total solar eclipse passed over Georgia. Valdosta was in the path of totality during that event.

WALB News Ten's Desirae Duncan reached out to people on Facebook to see what they remember about that day. Here are some of the answers she received:

"It was total in Valdosta...so my dad and mom drove a friend and I down there to Valdosta State University. We were there in front of the main building and it was quite an experience...It is really odd to go from daylight to night in the middle of the day."

"As we were coming back from fishing, it started to get dark, and the street lights came on. This was about noon time, and it lasted about three hours from start to finish. It was eerie and exciting to say the least, but we weren't scared. My friends and I had a blast that day."

We went outside and began to notice several things - changing sounds, changing temperatures, changing scents in the air.. Birds were hurrying to roost, Night bugs were beginning to sing. Bats came out. Dusk was happening swiftly before us and nighttime was approaching. Our eclipse was 90%, so it never got completely dark, but it was an amazing thing to experience daytime, dusk, mostly night, dawn, morning, then daylight again. 

For more information on Monday's eclipse, click here

The next solar eclipse to cross the United States will be in 2024.

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