How Monday's eclipse will affect the weather - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

How Monday's eclipse will affect the weather

The path of totality will pass over Northeast Georgia. (Source: NASA) The path of totality will pass over Northeast Georgia. (Source: NASA)
South Georgia isn't in the path of totality, but the sun will be nearly 90% covered. (Source: NASA) South Georgia isn't in the path of totality, but the sun will be nearly 90% covered. (Source: NASA)
A solar eclipse is when the moon will block out light from the sun. (Source: WALB) A solar eclipse is when the moon will block out light from the sun. (Source: WALB)
The next eclipse over the United States will be in 2024. (Source: Great American Eclipse) The next eclipse over the United States will be in 2024. (Source: Great American Eclipse)
NASA scientist, Dr. Lika Guhathakurta has been looking forward to Monday's eclipse for many years. (Source: NASA) NASA scientist, Dr. Lika Guhathakurta has been looking forward to Monday's eclipse for many years. (Source: NASA)
ALBANY, GA (WALB/CNN) -

As you prepare for the eclipse you may want to add a jacket to your checklist.  

Monday's solar eclipse will cause a change in weather.

First Alert Meteorologist Andrew Gorton interviewed NASA scientist Dr. Lika Guhathakurta to find out what causes this temperature drop and why the wind will pick up.

"The temperature is going to drop significantly and that drop in temperature is actually going to create different kinds of wind velocity," said NASA scientist Dr. Lika Guhathakurta. People are actually going to experience little micro-climates, especially in the path of totality where it is going to be completely dark."

The 'eclipse wind' is the change in wind direction caused by the moon temporarily blocking out the sun.

Much like when the sun sets every day, the ground will cool which causes a decrease in temperatures as well as a change in direction.

The eclipse will have the biggest impact on the weather in the path of totality, where temperatures could drop up to 20 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the terrain, cloud cover, and humidity.

Even though most of Southwest Georgia will experience at least an 85 percent coverage, partly cloudy skies and the possibility of scattered showers will likely limit our temperatures to falling a handful of degrees.

During maximum coverage, the sky will turn to dusk, crickets and frogs will make their normal evening noises and some animals may start getting ready for bed.

Many schools in Southwest Georgia are taking advantage of this rare event as an educational opportunity.

"This can have a lasting impression on this younger generation in a way I don’t even know how to describe," said Dr. Guhathakurta.

The last solar eclipse to pass over the United States happened nearly 48 years ago and was only visible in Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, Oregon, and Washington.

Monday's eclipse provides an educational opportunity for the entire county, with every state experiencing at least a partial solar eclipse.

Dr. Guhathakurta hopes Monday's eclipse inspires students young and old to further their education in the field of science.

"This is going to have such an impact on this generation, I believe," said Dr. Guhathakurta. "You know it is one thing to learn about the sun, our planet, how the sun affects our climate. It is quite another thing to actually feel it or see it."

For more information on Monday's eclipse, click here

The next solar eclipse to cross the United States will be in 2024.

Copyright 2017 WALB. All rights reserved.

Keep up with WALB on the go! 
Follow us on social  
   and download our apps!

Powered by Frankly