Need solar eclipse glasses? Time, and supplies, are running out - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

Need solar eclipse glasses? Time, and supplies, are running out

If you're planning on watching the eclipse, you'll need to have special glasses to protect your eyes. (Source: American Astronomical Society) If you're planning on watching the eclipse, you'll need to have special glasses to protect your eyes. (Source: American Astronomical Society)
South Georgia isn't in the path of totality, but many in the region will see around a 90% totality - meaning 90% of the sun will be covered by the moon. (Source: NASA) South Georgia isn't in the path of totality, but many in the region will see around a 90% totality - meaning 90% of the sun will be covered by the moon. (Source: NASA)
(WALB) -

We've all been talking about it all summer, but in case you're really out of the loop, a total solar eclipse is happening on August 21.

South Georgia isn't in the path of totality, but many in the region will see around a 90 percent totality - meaning 90 percent of the sun will be covered by the moon.

So what do you need to experience the eclipse? Eye protection!

You'll need special glasses in order to view it safely. While the moon will be covering the sun, parts of the sun will still be exposed, and you risk irreversible eye damage if you don’t protect yourself.

How do you get them?

If you ordered your glasses online, you need to make sure they are authorized and weren't part of a recall that Amazon issued Monday.

Stores like Lowe's, Toys "R" Us and Walmart have said they are stocking the glasses, but you may want to call and check first.

You can also call your local library to see if they’re offering solar eclipse glasses.

WALB is working to find out the local businesses in our area that are offering glasses for sale. We will update this story with those details. But if you see some when you're out, let us know!

What if you can't buy the glasses?

If it's too late to buy the special eclipse glasses, there are still a few things you can do to keep your eyes safe:

  • Welding masks- According to NASA’s website, sun filters like eclipse glasses "have a thin layer of aluminum, chromium or silver deposited on their surfaces that attenuates ultraviolet, visible, and infrared energy,” making it safe to look directly at the sun. Number 14 welder’s glass has similar properties. 
  • Special projections – NASA suggests a few different options for projection methods you could follow.

There are also a few DIY options you could try.

However, you don't want to try to take photos or videos of the eclipse without protection for the lens. Here's how you can protect your smartphone.

Items that are not safe to use to view the eclipse:

  • The naked eye
  • Sunglasses
  • Solar glasses that are not NASA approved
  • Telescopes without approved filters
  • Binoculars without approved filters
  • Cameras without approved filters

If you want to see what the eclipse will look like in your town, you can put in your zip code here, or look at a map here.

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