10 Years Later: Americus tornado still a vivid memory - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

10 Years Later: Americus tornado still a vivid memory

Wednesday marked 10 years to the day since an EF 3 tornado slammed into Americus. (Source: WALB) Wednesday marked 10 years to the day since an EF 3 tornado slammed into Americus. (Source: WALB)
The storm killed two people, and people in Americus remember vividly the events of March 1, 2007. (Source: WALB) The storm killed two people, and people in Americus remember vividly the events of March 1, 2007. (Source: WALB)
Though there's little physical evidence of the storm, a lot of emotional evidence remains. (Source: WALB) Though there's little physical evidence of the storm, a lot of emotional evidence remains. (Source: WALB)
David Mays, an Engineer with the Americus Fire Department, was working that night. (Source: WALB) David Mays, an Engineer with the Americus Fire Department, was working that night. (Source: WALB)
"Trees began to fall, powerlines were all on the ground, transformers were blowing up," said Sheriff Smith. (Source: WALB) "Trees began to fall, powerlines were all on the ground, transformers were blowing up," said Sheriff Smith. (Source: WALB)
AMERICUS, GA (WALB) -

Wednesday marked 10 years to the day since an EF-3 tornado slammed into Americus.

Video caught on the Sumter Regional Hospital surveillance camera is still chilling, showing the tornado ripping the building beyond repair.

The storm killed two people, and people in Americus remember vividly the events of March 1, 2007.

"That's one that you'll always remember," Sumter County Sheriff Pete Smith said of that day. "You've never seen the amount of lightning and thunder."

David Mays, an Engineer with the Americus Fire Department, was working that night.

"Everything just seemed kind of unrealistic, is this really happening," said Mays.

"Trees began to fall, power lines were all on the ground, transformers were blowing up," said Sheriff Smith.

That night, Mays and his fellow firefighters headed to the hospital to evacuated dozens of patients. However, because of trees blocking roads, they had to park half a mile away and walk to the hospital.

"We went there, and it was chaotic," Mays recalled. "There were some collapsed areas, a lot of blown out windows, water running everywhere."

"It scared me to death," said Sheriff Smith. "I'll be perfectly honest with you."

10 years later, the memories are still vivid. Though there's little physical evidence of the storm, a lot of emotional evidence remains.

"People just couldn't believe that we didn't have anymore deaths than we had. We lost two people. That's two more that I wish we hadn't have lost," said Sheriff Smith.

Though things seem back to normal, that day is not something the city of Americus will soon forget.

"Even this far out, we're still affected," said Mays.

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