New App helps VSU students - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

New App helps VSU students

The Guardian app is providing a new form of protection to VSU students. (Source: WALB) The Guardian app is providing a new form of protection to VSU students. (Source: WALB)
The app also has a panic button to alert officials immediately if something is wrong. (Source: WALB) The app also has a panic button to alert officials immediately if something is wrong. (Source: WALB)
Students at Valdosta State University now have a new form of protection at their fingertips.  (Source: WALB) Students at Valdosta State University now have a new form of protection at their fingertips.  (Source: WALB)

Students at Valdosta State University now have a new form of protection at their fingertips. 

"It started with the conversation of we're already a safe place, what can we do to go even further?" said VSU director of public safety Alan Rowe. 

University officials announced the "Guardian App" which is offering extra protection to students.

It's something you can see nearly everywhere you look on campus- students using their cell phones. 

"Knowing the main folks we serve have this technology we wanted to give them a way to utilize it to reach out to us instead of just the traditional phone call," explained Rowe. 

Using the app students can set "Guardians." Like friends, family members, or campus police. 

"Feeling safe far away from home is everything," said Nicholas Reed, a VSU freshman. 

Then the app offers a safety timer, it notifies the guardian if a student doesn't make it to a destination in a certain amount of time. The app also has a panic button to alert officials immediately if something is wrong. 

"You're reassuring them that you're safe and they also know that if anything were to happen they have something to go off of," said VSU junior Jazmin Yellock. 

It's not just about your safety getting from one place to another. Students can also send anonymous tips for police officers as well.

"It'll help a lot in feeling safer as well as being able to just keep track of friends and just have fellow wing-men," said Reed.

For students, it's a safety blanket. 

"I do think it's a good idea and I do feel better having the app on my phone," said Yellock. 

For officials, the app is keeping them one step ahead. 

"We'll always be ready for the response part of it, but if we can prevent it from happening, that's the ultimate goal," said Rowe.

The app is free for students to download. Students can also find a link to the app in the V-State mobile app.

It costs the University about $7,000 a year, an investment University officials said is well worth it. 

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