DCSS helps students transition back to regular schedule - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

DCSS helps students transition back to regular schedule

Dougherty County School leaders estimate about 2,000-3,000 students have been impacted in some way by storms that hit on January 2nd and 22nd. (Source: WALB) Dougherty County School leaders estimate about 2,000-3,000 students have been impacted in some way by storms that hit on January 2nd and 22nd. (Source: WALB)
Since the storms on January 2nd, school guidance counselors, social workers and behavior specialists have been trained with how to help students during these difficult times. (Source: WALB) Since the storms on January 2nd, school guidance counselors, social workers and behavior specialists have been trained with how to help students during these difficult times. (Source: WALB)
DOUGHERTY CO., GA (WALB) -

Dougherty County School leaders estimate about 2,000-3,000 students have been impacted in some way by storms that hit on January 2nd and 22nd. 

Monday there were just over 800 absences. 

Dougherty County School System Spokesman J.D. Sumner says the storms have passed, but the number of absences shows the devastation is still present.

"A lot of people are still suffering, a lot of people are still struggling to get those needs back and established," said Sumner.

Since the storms on January 2nd, school guidance counselors, social workers and behavior specialists have been trained with how to help students during these difficult times. 

Like Marion Stevens, the coordinator of Student Support Services for the school system.

"Dr. Nick Carton explained to them what was going to be happening, what to look for, what to expect when the children came back, so when they got here we were well prepared for them," said Stevens.

She's been helping both students and their parents. For parents she says they are still trying to figure out where they are going to live. Many have been in and out of shelters. 

"How long are my children going to be unstable? That's their biggest concern," said Stevens.

Within the schools, they have been collecting items from the community to bring to the parents.

As for the students, leaders are helping them deal with images they've seen. 

"We have one child we are concerned about because we know he saw one of the bodies," said Stevens.

They recommend parents stay positive in front of their kids. Marion says that's the biggest message. She knows this community will pull together.

"You have a good support system at home, a good support system in the community. So with all of these entities you are going to be okay," said Stevens.

Marion says she was living in Albany during the flood of '94. 

She remembers what the school system did for her kids and now she wants to do the same. 

For those wishing to donate to students in need, you can find out how to here.

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