Pecan farm reports 3,000 trees damaged after storm - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

Pecan farm reports 3,000 trees damaged after storm

Clean up continues in Mitchell County after the devastating storms earlier this month.  (Source:National Pecan Co.) Clean up continues in Mitchell County after the devastating storms earlier this month.  (Source:National Pecan Co.)
(Source: National Pecan Co.) (Source: National Pecan Co.)
"Estimates are people tell us the ones in Lockett station in Dougherty county are 85 years old so it's a huge loss," said Posey. (Source:WALB) "Estimates are people tell us the ones in Lockett station in Dougherty county are 85 years old so it's a huge loss," said Posey. (Source:WALB)
MITCHELL CO., GA (WALB) -

Clean up continues in Mitchell County after the devastating storms earlier this month.     

Pecan Farms especially were severely damaged.

Thousands of trees were torn down during the storm.

When you fly over the National Pecan Company you see tree after tree laying down, 3,000 to be exact.

"Its heartbreaking you know especially with all the work, you know we took over alot of these orchards and getting them turned back into productive orchards," said Fred Posey, Operations Manager.

Trees that date all the way back to 1902 are now uprooted from the storm and completely damaged.

"Estimates are people tell us the ones in Lockett station in Dougherty county are 85 years old so it's a huge loss," said Posey.

The trees are very expensive to fix.

According to the University of Georgia, losing a pecan tree that is about 15 years old will cost $521.

"Probably through that weekend you know about a million dollars in damage," said Posey.

That amount doesn't include the impact they will have later down the road when they aren't able to harvest as many pecans.

"The stuff in Mitchell County, we had a little bit left to harvest. We lost about 20,000 pounds that was not able to harvest. Not including what it will effect for years to come," said Posey.

A huge impact to the company, as well as the community.

"2016 has kinda lingered in, we went from 2 hurricane damages, and here in this unit 1 you know we had this tornado. With farming you know there is always a mother nature risk,"

A risk that these farmers say is worth it in the long run.

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