Rain brings brief relief to farmers - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

Rain brings brief relief to farmers

Mark's Melon Patch is staying busy despite the drought. (Source: WALB) Mark's Melon Patch is staying busy despite the drought. (Source: WALB)
This is the second time Mark has planted strawberries. He is not worried about the drought or cold weather killing them off. (Source: WALB) This is the second time Mark has planted strawberries. He is not worried about the drought or cold weather killing them off. (Source: WALB)
Mark is still harvesting green peanuts and tomatoes, both of which are for sale at his melon patch. (Source: WALB) Mark is still harvesting green peanuts and tomatoes, both of which are for sale at his melon patch. (Source: WALB)
Despite this week's rain, we need a lot more for next year's growing season to be successful. (Source: WALB) Despite this week's rain, we need a lot more for next year's growing season to be successful. (Source: WALB)
Mark is hoping for more rain, but knows his melon patch will be fine even if the drought continues for a few months. (Source: WALB) Mark is hoping for more rain, but knows his melon patch will be fine even if the drought continues for a few months. (Source: WALB)
SASSER, GA (WALB) -

After 64 days of no rain in southwest Georgia, we finally got some relief Wednesday, which was a welcome change for South Georgia farmers.

"It has just been a dust bowl, like everyone knows," said owner Mark Daniel.

 Thankfully Mark's Melon Patch doesn't look like a dust bowl now, after 1.2" of rain fell on his fields this week.

The precipitation was vital because the lack of rain was beginning to prevent him from doing some aspects of his job.

"There were a lot of things that you couldn't do like land preparation, land tillage the crops weren't growing, you had to water them all the time so this is awesome," said Daniel.

Despite the setbacks, Mark kept his operation moving forward by planting strawberries and harvesting tomatoes, green peanuts and sugar cane. 

For the strawberries, this week's water will last even longer than most months.

"When you have something growing when it's cooler like this an inch of rain will last a week or so sometimes, whereas in the summer an inch or rain will last about three days. So it will last about twice as long," said Daniel. 

Even though this week's rain was a welcome sign, there is still a long way to go to before next growing season. 

"We need a lot rain between now and next spring for the summer requirements for water," said Daniel.

Daniel said this week's rain saved hundreds of dollars on irrigation costs.

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