Teen throws 'Hallobash' to help raise awareness for mental healt - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

Teen throws 'Hallow-Bash' to help raise awareness for mental health

Tiffany said the staff at BHS has helped her in many ways, and Hallow-Bash was one way she thought of to give back. (Source: WALB) Tiffany said the staff at BHS has helped her in many ways, and Hallow-Bash was one way she thought of to give back. (Source: WALB)
Each room was decorated for Tuesday night's Hallow-Bash. (Source: WALB) Each room was decorated for Tuesday night's Hallow-Bash. (Source: WALB)
While the event was meant to be fun, every game also helped participants learn how to cope. (Source: WALB) While the event was meant to be fun, every game also helped participants learn how to cope. (Source: WALB)
Tiffany Evans, event organizer (Source: WALB) Tiffany Evans, event organizer (Source: WALB)
Amy Gaiss, BHS therapist (Source: WALB) Amy Gaiss, BHS therapist (Source: WALB)
VALDOSTA, GA (WALB) -

A Valdosta teenager is raising awareness for mental health through a Hallow-Bash. 

She said she wants to show anyone who is suffering with mental illness that they are not alone. 

Walking through the hallways of Behavioral Health Services (BHS) in Valdosta was a little spooky on Tuesday. 

Each room was decorated for Tuesday night's Hallow-Bash. The event was planned and organized by Tiffany Evans, 16. She said that it's much more than just a party.

"I just wanted to say there's somebody out there who can help you," explained Evans. "You can talk to somebody." 

In fact, there are a lot of young people like her. BHS in Valdosta saw 351 minors in September alone. 

Tiffany said the staff at BHS has helped her in many ways, and Hallow-Bash was one way she thought of to give back. 

"They helped me to deal with my depression," said Evans. 

"I'm definitely proud of Tiffany, that's the feeling that comes to mind," explained Evan's therapist with BHS, Amy Gaiss. 

Gaiss said that Tiffany has grown in many ways throughout this experience

"Tiffany herself has developed more self confidence," said Gaiss. "She's making more friends at school." 

While the event was meant to be fun, every game also helped participants learn how to cope.

"They get some great coping skills throughout the clinic," explained Gaiss. "Stress balls. There's going to be bubbles for deep breathing." 

Even a simple beanie bag toss made a big difference.

"Each beanie bag represents a positive thing in your life and you're supposed to feed it to the monster," said Evans. 

The event was open to all Behavioral Health Service families.

Copyright 2016 WALB. All rights reserved. 

Powered by Frankly