ECES students create newscasts of their own - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

ECES students create newscasts of their own

Students put together a newscast each day. (Source: WALB) Students put together a newscast each day. (Source: WALB)
Students get to take part in all roles. (Source: WALB) Students get to take part in all roles. (Source: WALB)
Students get to learn about the different aspects. (Source: WALB) Students get to learn about the different aspects. (Source: WALB)
Hailey Hodges stays after to help edit. (Source: WALB) Hailey Hodges stays after to help edit. (Source: WALB)
Crystal Crozier is the teacher. (Source: WALB) Crystal Crozier is the teacher. (Source: WALB)

Students at Early County Elementary School are getting a peek at what it takes to put on a newscast. 

Third graders spend 45 minutes everyday putting together the "Little Bobcat Action News."

When the clock struck two, the lights went out and the cameras rolled.

Students in Mrs. Crozier's classroom said their opening line. 

"Good morning and welcome to little bobcat news," said Layla Jackon, was one of the anchors on Friday.

Crozier wanted to do newscasts with her students as an enrichment activity. 

"I was trying to think of something that could use a little bit of everything so I thought something like a newscast would be something cool."

With borrowed equipment from Early County High School's production club she was able to make it happen everyday.

"They come in so eager. They want to do it. They love finding out news stories. They will tell me things that they want to report on. 

And they all find their niche.

Layla Jackson wants to be a TV show host, Xaylin Thompson said he wants "to be a sports man" when he grows up. 

And Sierra Cance'l wants to track the storms.

"I would like to be a meteorologist or a storm chaser," she said. 

Hailey Hodges even stays after school to help with extra editing. 

"She will be sitting outside my door because she likes to edit things that we didn't get to in class," said Crozier.

Crozier says she's amazed at how much they are learning. 

"We don't hear a lot of 'ums' and 'likes'. They are just becoming more articulate," said Crozier. "Students who were afraid to talk in class, I've seen them suddenly start answering. They are more vocal."

They are vocal about how the Bobcat newscast is the favorite part of their day.

The students' videos are posted on the school's Facebook page

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