South GA fish cut back on mosquito population - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

South GA fish cut back on mosquito population

Gambusia Fish, commonly known as mosquito fish, eat mosquito larvae (Source: WALB) Gambusia Fish, commonly known as mosquito fish, eat mosquito larvae (Source: WALB)
DNR officials say it's crucial to make sure you have fish in any standing body of water around your home. (Source: WALB) DNR officials say it's crucial to make sure you have fish in any standing body of water around your home. (Source: WALB)
Kim Holyoak, Ken's Hatchery (Source: WALB) Kim Holyoak, Ken's Hatchery (Source: WALB)
ALAPAHA, GA (WALB) -

The Zika virus is becoming a bigger threat to South Georgia every day.

There are a variety of ways you can protect yourself, but there may be one that you haven't though of.

A fish hatchery has an environmentally friendly way to get rid of mosquitoes.

The owners of Ken's Hatchery said a specific type of fish are a great way to cut back on the mosquito population in the area.

"If you stock them and have them in your pond already, the next new virus that comes up from mosquitoes you're already protected from. You've already got your prevention there," said owner Kim Holyoak.

Mosquito prevention in the form of a 2-3 inch fish, one that is extremely common throughout South Georgia. 

"They eat mostly bugs and small insects and one of the things they are known to eat, of course, are mosquito larvae," said Rob Weller, DNR Fisheries Supervisor.

These insect eating swimmers are Gambusia Fish, commonly known as mosquito fish. 

"They'll keep mosquitoes from being within the area of your home," said Holyoak. 

DNR officials agree, and add it's crucial to make sure you have fish in any standing body of water around your home. 

"If you have a pond and there's any fish in it at all, you won't have any mosquitoes. Mosquitoes come from the standing water that does not have fish in them," said Weller.

And throwing in the mosquito eating fish is a big bonus. 

"All fish will eat mosquito larvae, I guess maybe these guys just specialize a little bit in eating those little insects," said Weller. 

Copyright 2016 WALB.  All rights reserved.   

Powered by Frankly