Law enforcement agents train to battle terrorism - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

Law enforcement agents train to battle terrorism

Dozens of law enforcement South Georgia officers were trained on how to deal with potential threats of terrorism. (Source: WALB) Dozens of law enforcement South Georgia officers were trained on how to deal with potential threats of terrorism. (Source: WALB)
The training covered issues from terror attacks and sex trafficking, to how to share information and detect threats. (Source: WALB) The training covered issues from terror attacks and sex trafficking, to how to share information and detect threats. (Source: WALB)
Federal, state and south Georgia law enforcement officers learned their role in the GBI's Georgia Information Sharing and Analysis Center. (Source: WALB) Federal, state and south Georgia law enforcement officers learned their role in the GBI's Georgia Information Sharing and Analysis Center. (Source: WALB)
Albany State University Police Assistant Chief Gregory Elder (Source: WALB) Albany State University Police Assistant Chief Gregory Elder (Source: WALB)
GBI Assistant Special Agent In Charge Andy Mossman (source: WALB) GBI Assistant Special Agent In Charge Andy Mossman (source: WALB)
ALBANY, GA (WALB) -

Dozens of law enforcement officers from around the state talked about terrorism and ways to prevent attacks on Tuesday in Albany.

The GBI led the law enforcement conference at Albany State University. Agents said that information sharing is one way to defend against terrorism and terror crimes.

Federal, state and south Georgia law enforcement officers learned their role in the GBI's Georgia Information Sharing and Analysis Center, or GISAC.

"With ISIS working worldwide, with other concerns in our communities, we thought it was a good opportunity to come out here and reach out to our local partners. And talk to them about how to make their communities safer," said GBI Assistant Special Agent In Charge Andy Mossman.

Albany State University Police said holding this information session at their campus is vital, because of the number of people they will have visiting their campus in the coming months.

"With us being heavily populated and having a high residential capability, the more people come the more threats could potentially come," explained Albany State University Police Assistant Chief Gregory Elder.

The officers were given classified law enforcement briefings on current potential threats or acts of terrorism, from attacks to sex and human trafficking.  

The GBI said that their sharing of information from community tips helps them uncover threats.

"I think when we engender and foster trust in our communities, we enable better and more accurate reporting about our threat pictures," said Mossman.

The GBI said that they have prevented a number of terror threats across Georgia because of law enforcement sharing information from community tips.

GBI agents said law enforcement can not sit back and think terrorism will never happen in their community.  

Albany State University Police agree, saying they have to recognize it could happen on their campus, in order to protect against a threat.

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