Bee experts remove bees from Jimmy Carter National Historic site - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

Bee experts remove bees from Jimmy Carter National Historic site building

Bee experts use their creative tools to extract bees from inside the flue. (Source:WALB) Bee experts use their creative tools to extract bees from inside the flue. (Source:WALB)
An Americus fire truck elevated the experts more than 50 feet onto the building to get the job done. (Source:WALB) An Americus fire truck elevated the experts more than 50 feet onto the building to get the job done. (Source:WALB)
More than 50,000 bees were removed from the flues. (source:WALB) More than 50,000 bees were removed from the flues. (source:WALB)
Dale Richter, Georgia Master Beekeeper (Source:WALB) Dale Richter, Georgia Master Beekeeper (Source:WALB)
Barbara Judy, Park Superintendent (Source:WALB) Barbara Judy, Park Superintendent (Source:WALB)
PLAINS, GA (WALB) -

Bee experts remove bees from the old high school at the Jimmy Carter National Historic Site so they can continue renovations.

 It was a buzz in Plains as bee experts worked to remove bees and its hive inside the chimney.

"We began repainting Plains High School which is the visitor’s center for our park in the Fall and when that happened we discovered that we had animal populations in two of our flues,” said Barbara Judy, Park Superintendent.

The bees were discovered in November when they called in Georgia Master Beekeeper, Dale Richter, to do the job.

"They were about seven feet long so they actually ended up being about 11 to 15 feet down in the flue,” said Dale Richter, Georgia Master Beekeeper.

An Americus fire truck elevated the experts more than 50 feet on top of the building. They created a vacuum and an extension pole to extract the bees from inside the chimney.

"We used twenty feet of hose to reach down in to get the debris out, but we had extension poles that reached about 18 feet to get down to where we could get all of the debris out,” said Richter.

Richter says the bees weren't aggressive. It took them six hours to remove more than 50,000 bees, including the Queen Bee.

"It was a very tight quarter,” said Richter. “It was only about a brick and a half wide."

"You just can't have these resonant animal populations,” said Judy. “It's not good for the long term stability of the building."

Richter says they put a temporary seal on the flue. Park officials say they plan to resume renovation work in a month.

Copyright 2016  WALB.  All rights reserved.   

Powered by Frankly