Duck struck by toy arrow survives - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

Duck struck by toy arrow survives

Drake had three inches of the arrow in his body. Drake had three inches of the arrow in his body.
Drake is on his way to recovery Drake is on his way to recovery
Rescuers are warning parents of the dangers of the toy arrows to wildlife. Rescuers are warning parents of the dangers of the toy arrows to wildlife.
Animal Health Center Veterinarian Dr. Tad Moseley Animal Health Center Veterinarian Dr. Tad Moseley
Wildlife Rehab Specialist Libby Carey Wildlife Rehab Specialist Libby Carey
VALDOSTA, GA (WALB) -

Drake the duck is recovering after he was struck by a toy arrow. 

A woman in a Valdosta neighborhood noticed Drake had an arrow through his body and contacted Georgia Wildlife Rescue. It took rescue volunteers 4 days to catch the duck and get him medical care. 

"Through the efforts of some dedicated rehabers and animal lovers they brought him in to get taken care of," explains Animal Health Center veterinarian Dr. Tad Moseley. 

Nearly three inches of the arrow was inside of the duck's body, but now he is recovering quickly. 

"When I first got him you could tell he didn't feel very well. He just kind of sat around. Now he's a little ornery," explains wildlife rehab specialist Libby Carey.

Now rescuers are warning parents to make sure kids are supervised when playing with potentially dangerous toys. 

"Even though this is a toy it can cause a lot of damage to animals and people if you don't know what you're doing and you don't have the right training to use this," explains Carey. 

It might be a toy that hurt the duck, but there are legal consequences for shooting a wild animal even with a toy.  

"It's considered hunting and it's within the city limits. I'm sure they probably did not have the proper licenses to be hunting ducks, especially within the city limits. You can't do that," Carey urges.

Dr. Moseley says if the arrow hit him  just a half inch over the outcome wouldn't have been the same.

"Half an inch to the left it would've gone through his belly and that just would not have turned out as well," explains Dr. Moseley.

The Georgia Wildlife Rescue Association that helped save Drake is made up completely of volunteers. 

To help support their efforts to rehabilitate wild animals you can visit their website and donate here

Copyright 2016  WALB.  All rights reserved.

Powered by Frankly