Legendary Bainbridge train sent back home to Kentucky - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

Legendary Bainbridge train sent back home to Kentucky

The L&N 2132 locomotive has sat along the boat basin in Bainbridge for 36 years, and is over 100 years old. The L&N 2132 locomotive has sat along the boat basin in Bainbridge for 36 years, and is over 100 years old.
The train is worth over a million dollars but instead of selling it for money, Mayor Reynolds and city council members voted to send it back home to Corbin Kentucky. The train is worth over a million dollars but instead of selling it for money, Mayor Reynolds and city council members voted to send it back home to Corbin Kentucky.
Experts say they'll restore the train but will still preserve its historic value. Experts say they'll restore the train but will still preserve its historic value.
Maggy Kriebel, Corbin Muesum Director Maggy Kriebel, Corbin Muesum Director
Mayor Edward Reynolds Mayor Edward Reynolds
BAINBRIDGE, GA (WALB) -

The L&N 2132 locomotive has sat along the boat basin in Bainbridge for 36 years, and is over 100 years old.

"What's unique about L&N 2132 is that she's the last remaining switcher engine in the world that was built in the South Louisville shops." said Corbin Museum director, Maggy Kriebel.

Experts say the train was built in Kentucky and after it no longer had a purpose they sold the train to the Florida Gulf Power company, but shortly afterward, they didn't want the train either. That's when they called the Mayor of Bainbridge, the father of current Mayor Edward Reynolds, and asked if he could take it off of their hands.

"It just interested him from the aspect of its history and the fact that it was being left to rust," said Mayor Edward Reynolds.

But now the Corbin Rail museum in Kentucky wants the train back home. The train is worth over a million dollars but instead of selling it for money, Mayor Reynolds and city council members voted to send the locomotive back home to Corbin Kentucky. 

Reynolds added, "I don't think its right for us to; because of serendipity that we have it, that we charge somebody or we put it out there to see whose the highest bidder because its so rare, I rather see it go back to the people whose history that we worked with."

Experts say they'll restore the train but will still preserve its historic value. She says residents in the city can't wait to bring the train back home. Hundreds of people in Kentucky will have a homecoming celebration to welcome the train back home. The L&N train should return home by the end of this week.

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