Police chief who helped during '94 flood, now needs help - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

Police chief who helped during '94 flood, now needs help

Everything from the cabinets to the pool were damaged in Police Chief Charles Moore's home when the Christmas flood struck South Georgia. Everything from the cabinets to the pool were damaged in Police Chief Charles Moore's home when the Christmas flood struck South Georgia.
His son-in-law, a contractor, is helping with the repairs. His son-in-law, a contractor, is helping with the repairs.
Flooring, drywall, cabinets and even his pool were filled with creek water. Flooring, drywall, cabinets and even his pool were filled with creek water.
Leesburg Police Chief Charles Moore Leesburg Police Chief Charles Moore
Lee Purvis, Chief Moore's son-in-law. Lee Purvis, Chief Moore's son-in-law.
LEESBURG, GA (WALB) -

A man who was on the ground helping families devastated during the 1994 and 1998 floods is now a flood victim himself.

Leesburg's Police Chief Charles Moore is as well known for his good deeds, as he is for being a fair cop.

The Christmas flood damaged his home along the Kinchafoonee Creek, and he said he's now learning how to ask for help.

Flooring, drywall, cabinets and even his pool were filled with creek water.

"It's going to be time consuming," said Chief Moore. And time is something the chief has given freely to help others. "I like to help people, anyway I can, I don't care who it is if I can help them I will help them."

Just three days before the flood, Chief Moore was spending his free time delivering toys to Lee County's foster kids, just like he has done every year since he started the mission in 2001.

"So Christmas after lunch, we were moving everything out. So it was a pretty bad Christmas even though it was nice delivering the toys to the kids but for us, it was a rough Christmas," said Chief Moore.

And now Chief Moore is facing a rough several months of major flood repair ahead.

"My wife will fuss with me cause a lot of times people will say you need something I say 'No', because I am not use to taking nothing from nobody, but it's just nice to have a lot of people to offer to help you out," explained the chief.

His son-in-law, a contractor, is helping with the repairs.

And he and his wife have moved into a friend's home, helping hands for a man who has always been the first to lend his.

Chief Moore said that it will be early spring at the earliest before he will be able to move back into his home.

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