Grad students enjoy futuristic, energy-efficient home - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

Grad students enjoy futuristic, energy-efficient home

The exterior of the Future Farmstead Project The exterior of the Future Farmstead Project
The aquaponic system Miller helped build The aquaponic system Miller helped build
Even the sinks have features to conserve water usage Even the sinks have features to conserve water usage
The washing and drying machine The washing and drying machine
Rep. Autsin Scott attended the ribbon cutting Rep. Autsin Scott attended the ribbon cutting
TIFTON, GA (WALB) -

Ian Knight and Amanda Miller say they're blessed to live in this prized location on the Tifton campus of UGA.

Research they'll do at the future farmstead project could help put the home's advanced amenities in your home.

One of Knight's favorite features is the washing machine which doubles as a dryer.

"It's a really cool piece of equipment., said the doctoral candidate. "If you read the sign back there it operates on 15 dollars per year."

At today's grand opening, visitors saw the project's state of the art technology, including energy-saving temperature control.

"This house barely fluctuates in temperature, boasted Knight. "Once you get it set, it's so well insulated."

Joe West oversees the project. He says the resident grad students serve an important purpose.

"Not only evaluating and helping us test technology that we're using here," said West. "but then translating that to children and to other groups."

As an undergrad, Miller helped create a backyard system to raise fish and vegetation. 

"The goal of it was to create an aquaponics system for under $500. Feasible for a family to have one in their backyard."

That system is now in her new backyard.  It's energy-efficient, like everything else in the home.

"You can actually plus a little circle into the bottom of your phone," said Miller. "Lie it on the table, or on top of the counter top and it charges right there."

This induction cooktop heats pots directly through an electrical current, wasting no heat and saving money.

"Almost every day this week has been negative energy usage, said Knight. "We've put more on the grid from our solar panels than we've actually used living here."

"Because no house like this has ever truly been built before," said West who servers as Assistant Dean at UGA Tifton "It was really an evolutionary process."

A process that's leading the way to the future of energy efficient homes.

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