Cancer Survivor achieves improbable golf feat, twice - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

Cancer Survivor achieves improbable golf feat, twice

Steve Owens wants all cancer survivors to never give up Steve Owens wants all cancer survivors to never give up
Owens enjoys teeing off with his golf buddies on the weekends Owens enjoys teeing off with his golf buddies on the weekends
Herman Taylor recalls the hole-in-one on the 15th Herman Taylor recalls the hole-in-one on the 15th
Owens teeing up on the 15th hole (same one he score the ace on) Owens teeing up on the 15th hole (same one he score the ace on)
LEE CO., GA (WALB) -

59-year-old Steve Owens just sunk the second hole-in-one of his life. Even more impressive, the Mitchell county native is a cancer survivor whose family motivated him when he was ready to call it quits.

In November of 2010 Steve Owens was diagnosed with Lung cancer. Just the mention of it had him ready to surrender.

"You want to give up, said Owens. "In fact I went out and bought a pack of cigarettes. Then I said no, I'm going to fight it, and after a big fight, I won."

An accomplishment he holds higher than sinking his second ever hole-in-one at the Grand Island Club in Lee County last week.

"See I didn't believe it was going to go in. I thought it was short. And Tony kept going that's going in, that's going in. And I said no it's not, and then it just disappeared."

His golfing partner Tony Johns recalls the ace.

"Yeah I thought it was in the hole when it went left of the stick, said Johns. "Seen it bounce twice and go in the hole. And we was all shocked."

The euphoria of his second ever hole-in-one came after he recently realized he would beat cancer. 
Another golfer who witnessed his feat couldn't be more proud.

"It's just good to see somebody come back, said Herman Taylor. "And be able to do things they enjoy doing."

But the return to the greens wasn't easy. The surgery to remove the terminal disease wasn't smooth sailing, but Owens never lost focus in the process.

"They removed two thirds of my right lung to take the lung cancer out, said Owens. "The little piece of lung that they left kept collapsing. It finally did okay, and they had to put chest tubes in me twice but it finally healed up."

Now Owens said he is living cancer free. As he takes on each hole at the golf course, the wants to inspire other cancer survivors to attack the disease with the same perseverance he had.

"Everybody should, if they ever hear that c-word, don't think it's a death penalty because you can beat it. You just got to get out there and do what the doctor says and get cured."

And even after he was cleared to play, grand island club was accommodating to his condition.

"I get out of breath quick, said Owens. "When I first came back they let me drive right up to the greens so I didn't have to walk so far."

Now he walks to the hole on his own, or just sinks it in one stroke from the tee like he did last week.

While Owens is confident he is free and cleared, he'll continue to find refuge on the greens until his final checkup in October. 

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