Mom stands up for GA cannabis oil bill - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

Mom stands up for GA cannabis oil bill

FILE - In this Feb. 7, 2014 file photo, Aileen Burger loads an oral syringe with cannabis-infused oil used to treat her 4-year-old daughter Elizabeth, who suffers from severe epilepsy, at her home in Colorado Springs, Colo. FILE - In this Feb. 7, 2014 file photo, Aileen Burger loads an oral syringe with cannabis-infused oil used to treat her 4-year-old daughter Elizabeth, who suffers from severe epilepsy, at her home in Colorado Springs, Colo.
LEE CO., GA (WALB) - Traci Henry is a Leesburg parent who plans on rallying for the medical marijuana bill at the capitol. Her son is on lots of medication to treat his seizures, but she believes cannabis oil will give him a better quality of life.

"Sometimes as many as 13 to 15 pills a day," she says.

There's a load of paperwork outlining all of the medication 12 year-old Chance Henry has to take for his seizures.

"It's very hard, because I know the side effects to them. I don't even see sometimes how he functions, but he's always smiling, he's a loving child," Traci said.

Chance began having seizures when he was just six weeks old. "The worst day we've had is 26 in one day. When he gets sick he has more than he normally does. He did have two today, in the middle of the night." She estimates he's had 3,000 to 4,000 seizures in his life.

Now, his mother is fighting to put an end to the cocktail of medications and improve his quality of life.

"The side effects are dizziness, nausea. We have to have him tested yearly for liver damage, kidney damage. And with the cannabis oil there are no side effects."

Traci really began rallying to legalize cannabis oil about six months ago. "I just never thought it was attainable. I didn't know until I really started researching that in 24 states, it's legal. But there's no southern states it's legal in."

She's reached out to lawmakers in South Georgia and is hoping this bill could give Chance, a fighting chance.

"It makes me mad that my child can't get it," she said through tears.

Chance attends Twin Oaks Elementary School and has earned the nickname, Kissing Bandit. "If you've ever met Chance, you'll most likely have gotten a kiss from him. He's quite the little lover."

And Traci is hopeful lawmakers will think of Chance and other children like him when voting on this bill.

"I'd love to just throw all this paperwork in the fire and just give him this oil and it go away. I know it decreases seizure activity. I'm not expecting that it would completely take them away," explained Henry.

Chance is also one of the faces of Georgia's Hope, which shares the stories of children with seizure disorders in favor of this legislation.

http://georgiashope.com/


Click here for information on the push for medical marijuana.

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