Drowning prevention measures to keep kids safe in water - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Drowning prevention measures to keep kids safe in water

Updated:
© Comstock / Thinkstock © Comstock / Thinkstock
  • HealthMore>>

  • A little wine might help kidneys stay healthy

    A little wine might help kidneys stay healthy

    An occasional glass of wine might help keep your kidneys healthy, new research suggests.More >>
    An occasional glass of wine might help keep your kidneys healthy, new research suggests.More >>
  • People seek out health info when famous person dies

    People seek out health info when famous person dies

    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
  • Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>
    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>

SATURDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Every day in the United States, three children drown. Although many people expect a drowning child to splash and yell for help, these accidents often happen quietly without anyone noticing, according to a pediatric safety expert.

However, with proper training and supervision, drownings and other injuries are avoidable, said David Schwebel, director of the University of Alabama at Birmingham Youth Safety Lab.

"Backyard swimming pool drownings are far too common. These incidents are devastating to families, and they can be prevented," said Schwebel in a university news release. "A large portion of drownings actually occur quietly with little or no yelling or splashing. Many people drown while underwater and sink to the bottom, and only an observant lifeguard, parent or fellow swimmer can save that life."

The first step to take to protect children from drowning is to teach them to swim, Schwebel advised. "Swimming lessons are vital," he said. "The most recent scientific evidence suggests they may actually help a lot in reducing the risk of a child drowning while swimming."

Although learning how to swim is essential, even great swimmers can drown. Schwebel warned that all children, regardless of their swimming ability, must be constantly monitored while in water.

"Supervision is the first priority and not just intermittent checking," Schwebel cautioned. "A good supervisor must act like a lifeguard, constant and alert, not distracted by yard work, reading a magazine or text-messaging on a phone."

Among the other ways to keep children safe in the pool:

- Keep count. Anyone supervising children in water should know how many swimmers are in the pool. They should keep a constant head count to ensure that all swimmers are accounted for and safe.

- Enforce rules. Backyard pools need rules just like lifeguarded pools. Children should be expected to learn the rules and follow them to ensure their safety.

Swimming in the ocean is more dangerous and carries different risks than swimming in pools, Schwebel pointed out. Ocean currents can be unpredictable. Jellyfish and other ocean life can also cause injury, he added.

"If warnings are posted by lifeguards or other local authorities, they should be heeded," Schwebel advised. "You should never enter ocean water if authorities warn you that it's dangerous."

When swimming at a lake on in a river, it's never a good idea to jump in without knowing the depth of the water. Schwebel also cautioned that hidden rocks and logs could lie close to the surface of the water. Swimmers can hit these objects when jumping into the water.

"Swimming is great exercise, it is fun, and it keeps us cool in the hot summer," Schwebel concluded. "Children should learn to swim and learn to enjoy swimming, but we must always be alert of the risks of swimming and prevent drowning."

More information

The Nemours Foundation has more about water safety for kids.

Health News Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

*DISCLAIMER*: The information contained in or provided through this site section is intended for general consumer understanding and education only and is not intended to be and is not a substitute for professional advice. Use of this site section and any information contained on or provided through this site section is at your own risk and any information contained on or provided through this site section is provided on an "as is" basis without any representations or warranties.
Powered by WorldNow