Lowndes trucking company owner under federal indictment - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

Lowndes trucking company owner under federal indictment

LOWNDES CO., GA (WALB) -

The United States Attorney for the Middle District of Georgia got an indictment of Devasko Dewayne Lewis of Lowndes County for operating his trucks after the DOT issued an order for him to stop.

The DOT issued the order in 2008, and the government says that Lewis kept operating the trucks by registering them in other people's names.

Here is the news release sent by United States Attorney Michael J. Moore.

 

            Michael J. Moore, United States Attorney for the Middle District of Georgia, announced that Devasko Dewayne Lewis, age 34, of Lowndes County, Georgia, was indicted by a Federal Grand Jury sitting in Macon, Georgia on May 16, 2013 for two counts of making False Statements in a matter within the jurisdiction of a Federal agency in violation of Title 18 United States Code, Sections 1001 and 2, as well as Conspiracy to Continue Operations After Imposition of an Out-of-Service Order, in violation of Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Section 386.72 and in in connection with Title 49, United States Code, Section 521(B)(6)(A). 

 

            The indictment alleges that Mr. Lewis and his prior company, Lewis Trucking, was the subject of an Imminent Hazard Operations Out-of-Service Order issued by the Department of Transportation, Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, which was served on Mr. Lewis on October 6, 2008 and has remained in effect since. 

Mr. Lewis violated the Order by continuing to operate commercial motor vehicles and concealing his true involvement by filing the applications for Department of Transportation Motor Carrier Numbers under names other than his own.

            If convicted, Mr. Lewis faces imprisonment up to five (5) years, a fine of up to $250,000.00, and up to three (3) years supervised release, a mandatory assessment fee of $100.00 as to each of the false statement counts. With regard to the conspiracy count, the maximum penalty in the event of conviction is one (1) year imprisonment, up to $25,000.00 fine or both, and up to one (1) year supervised release, $25.00 mandatory assessment fee of $25.00.

            An indictment is only an accusation, and the defendant is presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt at trial.

            The case was investigated by United States Department of Transportation, Office of Inspector General and the United States Department of Transportation, Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.  The case is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Robert D. McCullers.

Copyright 2013 WALB.  All rights reserved.

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