Bill allows refusal of health care on moral basis - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Michigan Bill allows refusal of health care on moral basis

  • More WALB News10 HeadlinesMore News HeadlinesMore>>

  • Supreme Court to hear Cuthbert insurance case

    Supreme Court to hear Cuthbert insurance case

    Thursday, April 17 2014 10:15 AM EDT2014-04-17 14:15:49 GMT
    The Georgia Supreme Court announced that it will hear the case of BARZEY V. CITY OF CUTHBERT (S14A0620)  next week. A woman whose adult son was killed while working for the City of Cuthbert is appealingMore >>
    A woman whose adult son was killed while working for the City of Cuthbert is appealing a Randolph County court ruling that she is not entitled to her son's death benefit, even though she is his only legal heir.More >>
  • Today's the day for News on the Road!

    WALB anniversary tour starts Thursday

    Thursday, April 17 2014 9:04 AM EDT2014-04-17 13:04:46 GMT
    WALB News 10 is hitting the road for our 60th anniversary. You might remember this photo from 2004. Yolanda, Dawn, and Ben having fun with the Ladies of the Red Hat Society in Tifton for WALB's 50thMore >>
    WALB News 10 is hitting the road for our 60th anniversary. You might remember this photo from 2004. Yolanda, Dawn, and Ben having fun with the Ladies of the Red Hat Society in Tifton.More >>
  • Georgia jobless rate drops to 7 percent

    Georgia jobless rate drops to 7 percent

    Thursday, April 17 2014 8:50 AM EDT2014-04-17 12:50:25 GMT
    ATLANTA (AP) - State labor officials say Georgia's unemployment rate has dropped to 7 percent, the lowest rate since September 2008. The Georgia Department of Labor announced the new seasonally adjustedMore >>
    State labor officials say Georgia's unemployment rate has dropped to 7 percent, the lowest rate since September 2008.More >>

By DAVID EGGERT
Associated Press

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - The Michigan Senate may vote this week to protect health providers who refuse to provide services on moral or religious grounds.

State law already shields hospitals and doctors from having to perform an abortion. Supporters say the law should be broadened so providers and insurers don't face legal repercussions for not providing contraception, taking someone off life support or performing another procedure.

Many in the medical community say the bill is overly broad and a solution in search of a problem.

Versions of the legislation date back a decade. Supporters including the Michigan Catholic Conference are hopeful a conscience-objection measure becomes law since Republicans control the Legislature.

GOP Gov. Rick Snyder has no official position on the measure and typically isn't enthusiastic about social issues.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Powered by WorldNow