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GA researchers use dog virus to deliver vaccines

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ATHENS, Ga. (AP) - University of Georgia researchers are developing a method to use a virus linked to illnesses in dogs to deliver vaccines to humans.

The Athens Banner-Herald (http://bit.ly/UpFesb ) reports researchers are looking to use parainfluenza virus 5 as a mechanism to deliver vaccines to humans. The virus is linked to upper respiratory infections in dogs.

The newspaper reports the canine virus does not cause illness in humans, and researchers say they can reengineer the virus to carry and deliver specific vaccines to human immune systems. Researchers say the method is effective because human immune systems are unable to recognize the canine virus and destroy it.

Scientists have used the virus to vaccinate mice against bird flu, and say they're working toward developing vaccinations for malaria, a strain of tuberculosis and HIV.

Information from: Athens Banner-Herald, http://www.onlineathens.com

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