Choosing the right yogurt for you - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Choosing the right yogurt for you

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If you're beginning to swap out some of your typical snacks like chips or cookies for yogurt, it's a great move. Many people think that any type of yogurt is good for you – but not all yogurts are created equal. Here's how to get the most out of your yogurt by choosing the right kind. 

Cleveland Clinic Registered Dietitian Tara Harwood says, "Choosing yogurt, in general, over some other snacks out there, such as potato chips or cookies, is a great option. However, if you're already eating yogurt now and have already made that step, why don't you take it a step further and start looking at the labels of the yogurt and start choosing the healthier versions of the yogurt such as the plain yogurts, the Greek yogurts, or the yogurts lower in sugar."

Some yogurts can contain as much as 30 grams of sugar per six-ounce serving. Harwood recommends buying yogurts with around 12 grams of sugar per six ounces. She also says to avoid any yogurt made with mostly high fructose corn syrup. Greek yogurt, which is thicker and tangier than regular yogurt, is another excellent option. It's typically low in sugar and high in protein.

But be mindful of yogurt's fat content.

"Yogurt can still be high in fat, so if you're watching your weight or concerned with your fat intake, I recommend a low-fat, plain yogurt, and then try mixing it with fresh fruit," says Harwood.

Fresh fruit provides antioxidants and sweetness. Also try adding chopped nuts for healthy fats or whole grain cereal for crunch and fiber.

It's also worth choosing organic yogurt, especially for children. You'll be steering clear of hormones, antibiotics, and artificial sweeteners and dyes.

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