Albany Movement leader, Dr. William Anderson - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Albany Movement leader, Dr. William Anderson

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50 years ago, an Albany physician was elected president of the Albany Movement.

Dr. William Anderson, a native of Americus, became the primary spokesman for the movement.

He says the movement's peaceful demonstrations changed the way white people perceived black people, and the way African Americans looked at themselves.

"White people came to recognize that black people were not going to accept being second class citizens anymore. Black people found out that at least they can listen to us. They can't ignore us anymore," he said.

Dr. Anderson moved to Detroit shortly after the Albany Movement dissolved. He's the featured speaker at the 50th anniversary celebration.

 

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