Sex, drugs and alcohol: Tips for watching Super Bowl commercials - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Sex, drugs and alcohol: Tips for watching Super Bowl commercials with kids

Updated:
© iStockphoto.com/Brad Killer © iStockphoto.com/Brad Killer
  • More WALB News10 HeadlinesMore News HeadlinesMore>>

  • Kendrick Johnson family, attorney share investigation with ASU students

    Kendrick Johnson family, attorney share investigation with ASU students

    Wednesday, April 23 2014 5:39 PM EDT2014-04-23 21:39:41 GMT
    The family's attorney says evidence points to something other than suffocation by accident. He believes there are people who know what happened.More >>
    The family's attorney says evidence points to something other than suffocation by accident. He believes there are people who know what happened.More >>
  • Arrest made in Albany fatal stabbing

    Arrest made in Albany fatal stabbing

    Wednesday, April 23 2014 5:36 PM EDT2014-04-23 21:36:43 GMT
    The Albany Police Dept. reports that a man died after he was stabbed at 1903 Barnesdale Way last night. Details forthcoming on www.walb.comMore >>
    19 year old Robert Soilberry died after he was stabbed in the 1900 block of Barnesdale Way Tuesday night. D. A. Greg Edwards says he is investigating the possibility of self-defense in the case.More >>
  • Who is packing heat in public places?

    Who is packing heat in public places?

    Wednesday, April 23 2014 3:57 PM EDT2014-04-23 19:57:04 GMT
    Permitted gun holders can soon freely carry their gun in more places in Georgia, after Governor Deal signed a bill expanding gun rights.  Opponents of the law say guns don't belong in certain places.   "ThingsMore >>
    Permitted gun holders can soon freely carry their gun in more places in Georgia, after Governor Deal signed a bill expanding gun rights.  Opponents of the law say guns don't belong in certain places.More >>
  • Lifestyle HighlightsLifestyle HighlightsMore>>

  • Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.More >>
    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.More >>
  • Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>
    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>
  • A little wine might help kidneys stay healthy

    A little wine might help kidneys stay healthy

    An occasional glass of wine might help keep your kidneys healthy, new research suggests.More >>
    An occasional glass of wine might help keep your kidneys healthy, new research suggests.More >>

SOURCE Wake Forest University

As families get ready to watch the Super Bowl this weekend, what else will they see besides touchdowns and field goals?

Ads promoting alcohol and other products geared toward an older audience.

Christy Buchanan, professor of psychology at Wake Forest University and an expert on parent-child relationships, says parents shouldn't squirm on the couch until each round of beer ads is over, but should take action. They can turn uncomfortable moments in front of the TV into "values moments" with their children.

"It is important for parents to address issues and share their values," says Buchanan, "So, when beer commercials come on, talk about your views on drinking. There are so many societal messages that say 'drinking makes life fun.' This is a parent's opportunity to say what they think and start a discussion."

Pro football is by far the most popular sport to watch among kids; 66% of kids ages 7-11 say they watch pro football on television. A study by the non-profit group Common Sense Media reviewed nearly 6,000 commercials in 60 NFL games in a recent NFL season and found the following:

  • 300 of the ads were for alcohol
  • 40% of the games included advertisements for erectile-dysfunction drugs
  • 500 of the advertisements involved significant levels of violence, including gun fights, explosions, and murders
  • 80 of the advertisements involved significant levels of sexuality, including scenes about prostitution and strippers

Buchanan offers the following tips to parents trying to figure out what to do when a kindergartner asks, "What is Viagra?" or a teenager comments on how much fun people are having in a beer commercial:

  • Take a "values moment" -- Leave the TV on, but talk about family values. For older children (middle school age and up), use the opportunity to engage children in conversation, particularly about issues such as drinking.
  • Ask children what they think about what they are seeing or hearing, then respond to their perceptions and reactions.
  • Switch channels and find another show -- For younger children, hit the previous channel button to Animal Planet or "Sponge Bob" on the remote control. Go back to the game in two minutes.
  • Mute the TV -- Without the sound, commercials lose a lot of their impact. Use this time to talk about what's happening in the game.

"I do think that doing things like the Super Bowl can be 'family bonding' events despite the commercials," Buchanan says.

*DISCLAIMER*: The information contained in or provided through this site section is intended for general consumer understanding and education only and is not intended to be and is not a substitute for professional advice. Use of this site section and any information contained on or provided through this site section is at your own risk and any information contained on or provided through this site section is provided on an "as is" basis without any representations or warranties.
Powered by WorldNow