Telemedicine to combat doctor shortage - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Telemedicine to combat doctor shortage

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June 12, 2008

Valdosta - A Valdosta clinic has a new way to battle a doctors shortage.

Kids with lung disease and issues have to travel hours to see a doctor.

But Children's Medical Services has set-up telemedicine clinics for these young patients.

Specialists who live hours away examine patients over a computer.

The technology, with the help of a local nurse, allows them to do everything from hear a heart beat to write prescriptions.

Nurses say the system saves time and money for doctors and patients.

"Our kids would have to drive two to four hours up to Atlanta or Augusta to be in contact with these pediatric specialist and this provides a service where we can get our kids seen locally, more regularly and its easier on the families this way," says Sandee Simmons, Nurse at the Children's Medical Services.

The clinics are held every month.

Soon, they plan to broaden the range of specialists available for these clinics.

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