Albany gets money to fight toxins - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Albany gets money to fight toxins

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April 28, 2008

Albany -- An Albany community got money from the government to clean out toxins in the area.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency awarded a C.A.R.E. grant of almost 96 thousand dollars to clean up neighborhoods around Alice Coachman Elementary.

That money will pay to research what types of toxins are in the air, ground and water in the area that may have been contaminated during the floods.

"We want to make sure that they don't have environmental toxins in their homes because it could be in their homes, and they not know it. And the floods may have caused damage under their houses," said project manager Rebecca Reid.

The C.A.R.E. grants help support communities by using collaborative partnerships to reduce exposure to pollution.

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