History added to Lee County courthouse - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

History added to Lee County courthouse

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March 11, 2008

Lee County--  People walking through the Lee County courthouse can now read important historical documents including the ten commandments.

Nine documents now line one wall of the courthouse. They include everything from the Declaration of Independence to the Magna Carta. County leaders say the documents will guide them in how they govern.

First Baptist Church of Leesburg paid for the display.

"We think that they are very vital to our everyday lives and hope that everyone will come through the courthouse and look at them and thank the people that are responsible," said First Baptist Church of Leesburg Church Administrator Terry Grinsted.

Two years ago, state lawmakers passed a law allowing counties to put up copies of the ten commandments as long as they're displayed with other historical documents.  

feedback: news@walb.com?subject=LeeCommandments

 

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